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Accident and Emergency provision is essentially a monopoly within the NHS. If you fall and break your arm, it is where you have to go. If you are in a car accident, it is where you are taken. All in all, it is a crock. I have experienced it with my own family and found it is the lowest common denominator level of service. Yes, they will fix you up but it is done pretty poorly and the level of care in A+E is a shocker. My mother is currently in hospital, again, taken in through A+E and it is a grim business. They do the basics, and I know they have much to cope with given the tsunami of eastern europeans now demanding free treatment, but they do it pretty bady and in terrible conditions for the patient.

Anyway, comes this news..

 

Levels of demand on NHS accident and emergency departments in England have been described as unsustainable by the head of the health service regulator. Care Quality Commission chairman David Prior said there was no guarantee that another disaster like that at Stafford Hospital could not happen in future. Hundreds of people are thought to have died after receiving poor care there.

If the NHS departments cannot cope, as is being stated here, and thousands of people may needlessly lose their lives as a consequence, then isn’t it time that this function was put out to the private sector? Billions are taken from the taxpayer every year to supposedly fund the NHS and A+E within it and if, as seems to be the case, this is just not enough to feed the beast, then starve it and put out provision of service to those more capable of delivering it.

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4 thoughts on “TIME TO AXE NHS

  1. Commission chairman David Prior said there was no guarantee that another disaster like that at Stafford Hospital could not happen in future.

    Actually there is .. sack him and the rest of the pointless overfed and underworkd overpaid pointless drones who infest the NHS, spend the massive savings on frontline people .. job done.

  2. Our local A&E has been closed, with the “merger” of two hospitals. It is now a further ten miles to the nearest one along congested roads. The merged A&E hasn’t been increased in size to cope.
    But with the “merger” of the two hospitals to make savings, we have increased administrative staff. Each hospital previously had its “Chief Finance Officer”, now they have them both plus an “Executive Chief Finance Officer”.

  3. Remember when the telephone service was run by the government. All we had is a choice of black Bakelite telephones (occasional red ones and occasional white ones). Remember how long was the wait to be allocated a phone and remember how we had to share lines as well. Think on those lines when you think of the NHS (4 of them, one for each country in the Union). The NHS has to deal with urban areas, rural areas, routine procedures and anything but routine procedures, new pharmaceuticals, new diseases and so on and yet the Government keeps its hand constantly in the cake mix and determines, in a bureaucratic manner, how everything is done.

  4. “Levels of demand on NHS accident and emergency departments in England have been described as unsustainable by the head of the health service regulator.”

    A&E meets the commons problem. This is what happens to (limited) commons when access isn’t rationed. We can ration it by bureaucratic fiat, or a sensible way, say by market pricing. But unless access is rationed there’s no way around it.

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