45 3 mins 8 yrs

Yesterday evening, my daughter asked me what my opinions were on the huge search underway for that small boy who was reported as missing from his Scots home. I did not pause or attempt to maybe gather my thoughts together, I replied that it was a complete waste of time, the massive police presence and the search parties were deluded; as it was clear that a small boy simply could not have made his way out past two heavy doors from his home: the child was most probably dead, and the police should concentrate on the family, first and last.

I may sound cynical, in fact I probably am, but Police Scotland should never have organised or encouraged all the volunteers to join in the searches, as the probability of immediate family being involved in the death, as it turned out to be, was in the high 90%-ages.

Another tiny statistic has been written in the annals of this, the Nation which once claimed it cared, but now seems to be almost used to revealing the battered body of yet another victim of familial terror; probably brought on by drug abuse or parents who do not even deserve that title.

Mikaeel Kular is now out of reach of the person, probably his so-called mother, now in custody, possibly his father; as he is now in the ultimate ‘place of safety’; but hey, it is not all bad news, the small soft toy industry will probably see a boom in sales as silly people place ‘tokens’ all over the landscape; and the florists will be getting extra supplies in from overseas, as the ‘floral token’ industry  will also see a massive increase in sales!

A small child has been murdered, he should be laid to rest, but please, no more ribbons, or flowers, or candles, or cuddly bloody toys; please!

 

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45 thoughts on “A measured response?

  1. Well, that’s your ‘take’ on it Mike, but I see it slightly different.

    As soon as the family name came up most readers thought: “here we go again, yet another Indian sub-continental crime of some sort, where revenge/hatred/dispute, takes precedent over human life”.

    Get hundreds of people & scores of police looking for a “missing” person, when all along it was a foregone conclusion — a third world culture with third world values clashes with an advanced and civilised society.

    Your nasty jibe about the Brit’s sentimental reaction to such a tragedy tells me you don’t understand your own countrymen very well.

  2. Bernard

    You have absolutely no idea what has happened here and why. But don’t let that stop you speculating about ‘third world cultures’ and revenge motives. Of course such crimes as parents killing their own children or white Britons killing children never happen here in our advanced civilised culture do they ?

    Mike

    Why on earth are you bothered about people choosing to lay flowers and soft toys in memory of the poor child. What negative impact does such harmless gestures have on your life ?

  3. Colm

    You certainly don’t need the likes of me to give you a reminder about statistics.
    The Muslim population of the UK is mercifully small’ish, but the number of these family ‘disappearances’ are getting tediously, disproportionately common.

    In any case, that why I like ATW: David is not fussy about comments jumping-the-gun like this. Elsewhere it’s ‘comments are closed’.
    Long live the freedom of the internet I say.

  4. Absolutely Bernard. I would never wish to censor yours or anyone elses comments. Its what I love about ATW. You can freely put up suggestions that are wrong, and I can freely come along and correct you 🙂

  5. The truth is that in such cases (regardless of race) the culprit is most often a member of the household. The police know this. But it is also proper not to exclusively focus on the household because others could be involved and thus efforts can also be made in wider search which has in the past resulted in saving a child. While that might be a waste of time to the grumpy community, it isn’t to me.

  6. The Multicultured utopia marches on, oh the enrichment of it all.

    No go zones for police as minority communities launch own justice systems
    Rise in ‘community justice’ in Midlands cutting number of police calls
    Forces warn genital mutilations and honour killings are being kept hidden
    Follows conviction of Muslim Patrol group last year for ‘enforcing sharia law’

    Parts of the UK are becoming no-go areas for police because minority communities are operating their own justice systems, according to the Chief Inspector of Constabulary.

    The rise in ‘community justice’ means crimes as serious as murder and sexual abuse are going unreported – a situation reminiscent of Belfast in the height of the Troubles.

    Tom Winsor said police officers were simply never called to some neighbourhoods, where law-abiding people rather than criminals administer their own form of justice

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2541635/Murders-rapes-going-unreported-no-zones-police-minority-communities-launch-justice-systems.html#ixzz2qkovTs6M

  7. I agree with Colm, Mike. Why do you fuss about people leaving flowers and soft toys in memory of an innocent child?

    Most people do not have hearts of stone, blood that runs ice cold; it grieves many to read about the murder of an innocent child – even if they don’t know the child personally.

    Try to understand: you express your grieve with a post on ATW; some need to express their grieve with flowers and soft toys.

  8. The truth is that in such cases (regardless of race) the culprit is most often a member of the household. The police know this. But it is also proper not to exclusively focus on the household because others could be involved and thus efforts can also be made in wider search which has in the past resulted in saving a child. While that might be a waste of time to the grumpy community, it isn’t to me.

    The point here is Mahons that the police organised a land sea search..
    He was no longer in the flat when his family awoke at 7.15 this morning.

    Police have called in an air support unit and the coastguard to help with the search, and are asking anyone who believes they may have seen Mikaeel last night or this morning to contact them immediately.

    They said there is no evidence to suggest criminality but officers are keeping an open mind”

    The reality though is that his mother was not living with his father, nor his step father/her boy friend/whatever.
    So who was “the family” that awoke at 7:15 in the morning?
    Then who is going to believe that a little boy of three years old is going to get out of bed in the middle of the night, open the door to the flat, open the communal door and get on a bus/take a taxi to Kirkaldy on the other side of the estuary…

    It’s “PCPC” politically correct crap.

  9. I think Mike’s objection to the makeshift memorial is interesting and not necessarily nasty. Bernard notes that Mike’s remarks mean he doesn’t understand his own countrymen. When I first read it, I thought “stiff upper lip” approach; limit the public display of emotion…the “blitz spirit”, if you will. Didn’t the queen have to be “forced” to return to London after Diana’s death to deal with the outpouring of emotion? She wondered what happened to “quiet dignity”…or was that fictional? Is the preference for or against these makeshift memorials and pilgrimages to murder sites generational?

  10. She wondered what happened to “quiet dignity”…

    She may also have wondered why the hysteria of the public had to take precedence over her grandchildren, Diana’s sons, so that she had to leave them to pacify the mindless hordes.

  11. Quite possibly, Aileen. There was debate in the press about the pilgrimage to and the flowers placed outside the palace and as you say the public hysteria in general and whether it was appropriate…was that a turning point in the UK for makeshift memorials?

  12. mairin2
    You seem to be recovered from your discomfort?
    I hope so.
    You know one of the problems of cyber fellowship is that we so easily forget tha behind our cyber persona is a real, warts and all, imperfect human being..
    So for example, I know that Ernest is our Elder Blogger; not in the best of health but respected and appreciated by those of us who remember our own fathers..
    Then there is Henpecked Harri, Pompous Pete,
    you get the picture.
    I hope you are recovering from your own ill health and wish you well for the future.
    In response to your question,

    ” When I first read it, I thought “stiff upper lip” approach; limit the public display of emotion…the “blitz spirit”, if you will. Didn’t the queen have to be “forced” to return to London after Diana’s death to deal with the outpouring of emotion? She wondered what happened to “quiet dignity”…or was that fictional? Is the preference for or against these makeshift memorials and pilgrimages to murder sites generational?”

    I think you are right.
    My generation didn’t do stoopid stuff like leaving fluffy toys and bunches of flowers etc all over pavements.
    It wasn’t in our history.
    I still think it#s a sign of shallow vapidity, and cannot compare to visiting one of the war graves of whatever nationality in Europe.
    In those days the focus was on the deceased, not on those who built their memorials.

  13. Then there is Henpecked Harri?

    You try living with 4 females and then get back to me

    It’s the sheer number of shoes that gets me down 😉

  14. And some people wonder why I trudge around muddy fields in the wind, rain and snow on Sundays ..

    It’s for the silence 😉

    Oh and Diana was murdered.

  15. You try living with 4 females and then get back to me

    It’s the sheer number of shoes that gets me down 😉

    Hint:
    the more you assert your bloody minded masculinity the more they will respect you.
    Whatever they say, women like a man who exudes confidence and superiority over women whilst knowing the right time to offer sympathy and compliments.
    You’ll never (especially you) understand them, and truth be told, they don’t want you to. They want to be noticed, complimented and made to feel special.
    Makes no sense to a real man, but go with it Harri.
    It will improve your current miserable existence one hundred per cent.

  16. A8, I’ve decide to take the ‘blitz spirit’ approach when faced with misogyny…for now. And yes, feeling better every day. But I don’t want to talk about me or other commenters or bloggers, if you don’t mind. I found Mike’s comment interesting for the reasons stated and was curious as to what others thought.

  17. “women like a man who exudes confidence and superiority over women”

    Agit8ed – No wonder you were awarded the Feminist society’s ‘Male ally of the year’ award 🙂

  18. More on the little boy..

    http://www.scotsman.com/news/scotland/top-stories/mikaeel-kular-sadness-and-anger-at-futile-search-1-3273580

    Interesting that in the Daily Mail yesterday (p7)they reveal that the woman was involved with some quite dodgy people Mohammed Omar Abdi who was killd in a gangland shootout last year..

    Given that would be known to ‘Police Scotland’ and presumably the mother and family to Social Services, why the big search involving so many volunteers and resources?
    Surely taking into account any ‘previous’ they would have been alerted to the possibility of foul play?
    Or was this another politically correct police investigation?

  19. and some are born that way….. can we make a list?

    Only if you’re feeling brave -or suicidal? 🙂

  20. Hope. unless there are obvious signs (pools of blood) you expend the resources in hope to find a child. even the child of idiots and scumbags.

    A child is a universe of hope and sacred even to the majority of the seedy of life, so you expend the resources first. I am sure however there was some cop pulling the family history and running other avenues in the back ground.

    How would people react to the cops if because the parents weren’t all on the up and up went right into accusing them or their associates of something and then the boys body was discovered dead in a field due to exposure?

    No unless their are obvious signs you expend the resources.

  21. Agit8ed

    What would have been a ‘non-politically correct’ police response then ? To not bother searching for the child. To make automatic assumptions based on the family backgrounds. When a small child goes missing the police will of course always investigate and have in the front of their minds the possibility of family involvement, but until the child is found they cannot be certain and therefore the quickest and widest search and publicity is essential.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with having these big volunteer searches in tandem with other quieter routes of police inquiry. Or do you think in cases of ‘people like these’ – they shouldn’t bother ?

  22. Or do you think in cases of ‘people like these’ – they shouldn’t bother ?

    That’s rubbish and you know it.
    It’s not making automatic assumptions, it’s educated guesses based on experience.
    There is no way a three year old little boy (think James Bulger) is going to get himself up out of bed, open the door and the communal door and wander off into the night.
    Now it may be that the Police had already thought this but were also responding to public anxiety and willingness to help, who knows? In which case I was wrong to say it was PC, but there have been enough cases of toddler abuse in recent years to show that the perpetrator(s) are usually found close to home.

  23. Agit8ed

    When I was a similar age I climbed out of my bedroom window on the ground floor and wandered off for several hundred yards in the middle of the night before being seen by someone who luckily knew who I was and brought me back home. It is irresponsible to claim that “there is no way” certain things can happen. It was perfectly appropriate to try every avenue and option until the child was found dead or alive regardless of police suspicions.

  24. When I was a similar age I climbed out of my bedroom window on the ground floor and wandered off for several hundred yards in the middle of the night before being seen by someone who luckily knew who I was and brought me back home.

    “Ms Kular, a mother of five, had told detectives that she discovered her son was missing on Thursday morning after putting him to bed the previous night. His brown jacket, multicoloured gloves and shoes were gone.

    Initially police said Mikaeel might have left the flat by himself, but neighbours expressed doubts that a child of three would have been capable of opening the heavy main door to the apartment block.”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/33yearold-woman-arrested-and-charged-in-connection-with-death-of-threeyearold-mikaeel-kular-after-discovery-of-body-in-kirkcaldy-9069539.html

  25. The criticism of the police is off the wall. When Madelaine (sp?) McCann disappeared, a lot of the police focus was on the family. Of course they also considered an abduction and unfortuantely they were right.
    The girl was little older than this boy, yet could have been anywhere in the vicinity and beyond by the following day.
    Unlike seemingly a lot of folks here, the police have to make sensible assessements and decisions.

    Having said that, Colm, Mike is entitled to complain about all those fluffy dolls whether it affects his life or not. Do you only comment on things that affect you personally?
    It’s a question of taste. I also think a lot of it is over the top and motivated more by people wishing to be part of a mass emotional event rather than mourning for the child.

    I recently went to a large cemetry in Dublin with my sister, who’s the emotional type. There was one section of the place where – for some reason – only young people were buried. It was, in an otherwise very grey place, a rainbow of cheap colour – covered with ribons, soft toys, first pair of shoes, etc decorating the graves. The worst thing was that it had obviously rained about 100 times since some of the funerals, and the toys were already rotting, the colours running onto tiny white socks etc. Small animals had used the shoes for calls of nature.

    It was a mess of tackiness. The bereaved had apparently mourned very colourfully at the funeral, but then neglected to visit the graves ever since.
    Maybe all that tack had helped them “find closure” very quickly.

  26. Noel

    Of course Mike is entitled to his view. Where have I said he isn’t ? Just as I am entitled to express my bafflement as to why such harmless gestures would annoy anyone. I get your point about the messiness that can develop when such items are left to rot in the rain but Mike seems to have a visceral antagonism to the very act of people laying flowers/toys etc. That, I don’t understand.

  27. A child is missing and all stops are pulled out to find him. The police would have been idiots to presume that all future incidents will pan out like previous similar incidents. Our police are often rightly critisised when they jump to conclusions and have closed their minds to all other possibilities.

    There was a hell of a mess at Kensington Palace as so many people left the plastic on their floral tributes. It was litter with a time delay. The mass of soft toys would be better off being sent to hospitals for sick kids. However if it helps to ease the pain of a bereaved parent to leave a wee something, then I woukdn’t want them to be deprived of that.

  28. I can think of a few other reasons why some don’t like the practice besides those that Noel and A8 mentioned: they’ve become rather meaningless because they’re also made for the worst of criminals, money would be better spent by donating it to an official memorial or charity in the poor child’s name or toward funeral costs; the balloons can be hazards once released; the candles have been known to catch other things on fire, including the teddy bears, etc. I’ll leave your opinion that Mike’s comment mean he has a “visceral antagonism to the very act…” For somebody else to address.
    Personally, I haven’t made up my mind about them but I certainly understand why some municipalities are considering legislation against them. Mike is not alone in his opinion for a variety of reasons.

  29. There’s actually a book called “Grassroots Memorials: The Politics of Memorializing Traumatic Death”. It’s a compilation of of essays/studies by several authors. To be fair the editors conclude that they mark a fundamental change in the culture of mourning and the culture of social action. The intro is online and I read/skimmed about 2/3 of it. Much of the intro is about the history of makeshift shrines and the semantics—what do we call these things. But unlike a few ATW commenters, the authors and editors consider all sides of the issueS (because there are many) and make no personal attacks or insinuations because they recognize as many others do here that such memorials straddle the realms of public and private space. They impinge on laws and regulations on communal space and on private property. They present conflicts with governments and organizations that deal with public safety, health, and esthetic issues. The editors note there is a conclusive correlation between how familiar one is with the practice and their acceptance of it—age, religion, and locale/non-urbanites. (So it is quite understandable that Mike and others here don’t “get it” or accept it.) There are many people the world over, including the people who lost loved ones who outright reject these displays.

  30. I can think of a few other reasons why some don’t like the practice besides those that Noel and A8 mentioned: they’ve become rather meaningless because they’re also made for the worst of criminals, money would be better spent by donating it to an official memorial or charity

    Princess Diana would be turning in her grave ..

    Donations to Princess Diana landmine charity used to pay for the private education of chief executive’s children

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2542178/Donors-Princess-Diana-landmine-charity-paying-private-education-chief-executives-children.html#ixzz2qrl5IJlL

  31. They discuss Diana’s memorials in that book…she’s never been on my radar. I only like to learn about the royals who have been dead at least 100 years. In fact, I’m watching “The Madness of King George” right now. 🙂

  32. To be honest, King George does the 1778 version but it’s definitely a twerk and a bit of a bump (homage to the time the movie was made). Maybe Miley will center herself if she sees what happens to George???

  33. Just read this from a newspaper article regarding toys and tributes paid to this poor little boy Mikaeel Kular,

    “Another tribute, written in red ink on a card beside a teddy bear, said: “To Mikaeel. RIP little man. God obviously needed another angel. You didn’t deserve this.”

    God obviously needed another angel, so he arranged – your death?!
    Where does this kind of nonsense come from?

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