40 1 min 8 yrs

 

alfred the B4 sitting down, the fire is low, put more  : now the fire is hot . putting :

 

The above line refer to  a possibility in todays’ newspapers.

ATW readers have to identify the article in the newspapers, and the meaning of the foreshortened sentence

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40 thoughts on “Puzzle time

  1. It’s almost certainly apocryphal that King Alfred the Great burned any cakes. I certainly hope that his remains have been found. It would be hugely exciting.

  2. all I can get is …..the fire is low put more coal on now the fire is hot stop putting coal on.
    Is there an other word for comma that means check if

  3. I think it depends which paper you read it in, (eg The Sporting Life made no reference,) but definitely King Alfred the Great, King of the Anglo Saxons, a keeen cricketer and the Founder of the Royal Navy; or perhaps his son, or possibly his favourite serf?

    A great proto-Englishman anyway.

  4. ‘I certainly hope that his remains have been found. It would be hugely exciting.’

    I hope you were joking when you wrote that!…

  5. I certainly hope that his remains have been found. It would be hugely exciting.

    It would indeed. I personally find the Richard III find more interesting, mainly as I know more about him and am interested in that period of history and the prosaic nature of his resting place and manner of discovery “Oh there’s an R, lets dig there”.
    I accept though as Alfred is from a much earlier time this find is more remarkable and defies the odds. I will watch the up and coming programme with interest.

  6. Ernest Young –

    As I’ve said, I’m a history junkie. In particular, I have a passion for the Dark Ages and early Middle Ages.

    Without Alfred there would likely have been no England. He first promoted the idea of a united English people, an ideal which his grandson Athelstan completed. His life story and that of England’s beginnings (which were perilously close to being snuffed by the Danes) are one of history’s great and heroic tales.

    The hooligan Henry VIII caused Alfred’s remains to be lost. All Englishmen should hope that they can be identified again one day.

  7. Pete

    Didn’t you once laud Henry VIII as a great Briton due to his dissolution of the Monasteries, an act which I think more justifiably renders him a hooligan.

  8. Box of matches .. check

    Blue touch paper .. check

    Light blue touch paper and stand well back .. double cHeck

    cecil john rhodes (1853-1902)

    “Ask any man what nationality he would prefer to be, and ninety nine out of a hundred will tell you that they would prefer to be Englishmen”.

  9. Harri,
    that’s daft.
    Most of the world don’t know what being English means, and probably twenty per cent of Englishmen don’t deserve to be..
    🙂

  10. and probably twenty per cent of Englishmen don’t deserve to be..

    And most of them are from Norfolk 🙂

  11. So, what’s the significance of the burning cakes legend? Is it just part of a storyline or is there real meaning?

  12. I read it was something to do with Alfred being in hiding from rebels and an old woman gave him refuge in her home and while she was out he was supposed to keep an eye on her cooking cakes, but he failed in that simple task !

  13. Colm –

    I didn’t laud Henry VIII for his dissolution of the monastaries. He did it for personal gain. A long term side effect was that it scattered a massive amount of capital across a much wider portion of society than when the lands had been under ecclesiastical ownership. This was the very first spark of the Industrial Revolution (which Troll think started in the US).

    Catholic societies remained hamstrung for centuries because so much capital remained in the ownership of the Church.

  14. And most of them are from Norfolk 🙂

    The true Norfolkians such as my wife represent what is best and worst about the English.
    Kind, sociable, close to the soil, proud,conservative and slow to change.
    Avoid confrontation, don’t much get excited about important issues, parochial and insular.

    By contrast us true North Eastern Anglo Saxons,
    are quick tempered, fiery, value integrity and honesty as much as ability. Prone to punching people straight in the knee caps,
    BAM! BAM!!
    Anti-authoritarian, anti-Snob, anti-Smugg, anti-totalitarian.
    So we don’t take kindly to being talked down to by plonkers who think more of themselves than the evidence justifies.

  15. Agit8ed –

    Actually, he was an Anglo Saxon -as am I.

    Actually he was a Saxon, specifically a man of Wessex though there were plenty of Angles and Jutes around also. It was Alfred’s vision of a united Anglo-Saxon people which became England (i.e. Angleland). He may have taken some inspiration from Offa, who first styled himself ‘King of the English’.

  16. There was widespread abuse going on in monasteries but as Pete says, he did it for his own gain and little thought was given to the massive social consequences of dissolution. Very poor risk management but mainly due to lack of interest in the consequences to others. Reading a fascinating book about Anne Boleyn’s last days and apparently one of the main reasons why she and Cromwell fell out was that she wanted to use the money to do good He wanted it to just enrich the rich.

  17. I am no expert on this topic but didn’t the dissolution of the monasteries also involve a huge amount of reckless vandalism and scattering of the treasures and literary collections held within them ?

  18. Colm, on January 18th, 2014 at 4:56 PM Said:

    Pete’s an Essex lad. He’s like an older version of the TOWIE lads

    Only far more handsome 😉

  19. Shut up Mr Moore.
    He was Anglo Saxon,
    You just get on and answer my kvestion.
    Ot
    Very interesting that when I fist commented on this story there were loads of web links to the historical Alfred the Great and King Alfred.
    This afternoon all the links revolve around the discovery of the bones…
    1984??

  20. mairin2 –

    So, what’s the significance of the burning cakes legend? Is it just part of a storyline or is there real meaning?

    It was a piece of 11th-Century propaganda, basically.

    Alfred’s kingdom of Wessex had been reduced to a tiny hillock called Athelney. He was hiding out there with a handful of followers while Danish armies looked for him. That was where England began.

    He broke out, rallied the men of Wessex and went on to defeat the Danes in the following years. A hundred years later court chroniclers put out the story that Alfred came across an old woman in a hut while he was hiding out. She had no idea who he was but gave him shelter and asked him to watch the cakes.

    He started daydreaming about how to beat the Danes and the cakes burned. She came back and scolded him. Then his followers arrived and went down on a knee to their king. The woman was mortified and begged forgiveness. Alfred was magnanimous and told her he deserved to be scolded.

    It was a fairytale in an age when Saxons were still battling Danes across the country and (it seems) was supposed to both extoll Alfred and the Saxon cause.

  21. Thanks for that, Pete. Based on blurbs in a few newspapers, I couldn’t make out whether the story was to show his humility or as some stories said “his laziness” or inability to cook. I couldn’t find the details.

  22. There was widespread abuse going on in monasteries but as Pete says, he did it for his own gain and little thought was given to the massive social consequences of dissolution. Very poor risk management but mainly due to lack of interest in the consequences to others. Reading a fascinating book about Anne Boleyn’s last days and apparently one of the main reasons why she and Cromwell fell out was that she wanted to use the money to do good He wanted it to just enrich the rich.

    Wot?

    Alfred the Great 849 AD – 899 AD

    Henry VIIIth 1491 – 1547 AD

    And the connection is…..?

  23. The burnt cakes may or may not be true, but I don’t think such a mundane, “womens work” tale would have been included were there not a grain of truth or flour…

  24. It was a piece of 11th-Century propaganda, basically.
    A hundred years later court chroniclers put out the story that Alfred came across an old woman in a hut while he was hiding out. She had no idea who he was but gave him shelter and asked him to watch the cakes.

    It was a piece of 21st century Pete Moore interpretation basically.
    You don’t know that Moore.
    Why would they include a bit of girlie stuff like that if it wasn’t true?
    You think it was a bit of early Womens Institute propaganda?

  25. They both had their faults. Alfred couldn’t cook, and Henry couldn’t keep a wife :

    )

    🙂

  26. They both had their faults. Alfred couldn’t cook, and Henry couldn’t keep a wife 🙂

    Apparently he kept a few – other men’s wives. Their offspring could be looked after but he didn’t have to acknowledge them.

  27. and of course the answer, probably as a surprise is:-

    alfred the B4 sitting down, the fire is low, put more : now the fire is hot . putting :

    Alfred the (Great B) Before sitting down, the fire is low, put more coal on (colon: now the fire is hot, (Stop) putting coal on (colon)

  28. and of course the answer, probably as a surprise is:-

    alfred the B4 sitting down, the fire is low, put more : now the fire is hot . putting :

    Alfred the (Great B) Before sitting down, the fire is low, put more coal on (colon: now the fire is hot, (Stop) putting coal on (colon)

    You read the Bletchley Park Times I take it?

  29. //. Alfred couldn’t cook,//

    So it really was the beginning of England, as Pete says.

    I think the story about the cakes is a very early version of a common narrative device: the child in the idealistic hero contrasted with the common sense of a woman, usually for humourous effect. Common sense seems to be a woman’s part from Homer to Holywood (John Wayne being scolded by an old woman, etc.)

  30. Maybe, but yesterday after Pete wrote the above, I looked at the “official U.K. monarchy site” and it says something similar to what Pete says though it doesn’t call the story “propaganda” as Pete does. And the story first appears in the 12th century in court chronicles….a few news stories mentioned the humility angle of the legend. It’s not a big deal. I was just curious because I couldn’t find the explanation for the legend.

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