28 1 min 3 yrs

In Brooklyn, a landlord wants to replace the ” old ” system whereby tenants entered the building using keys.

The new system will be Stonelock which employs facial recognition technology.

With this technology, the landlord and presumably the vendor will have a record of every time you and your family enter or leave the building. Some tenants don’t like that. Some are concerned about the possibility of the landlord or Stonelock selling or giving their personal information to companies, or to the government.

The surveillance state is here. Private business is leading the charge.

Your home is your castle, even if it’s a rental.

Would you want the landlord and some vendor to have a years- long digital record of every time you enter and leave your castle?

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28 thoughts on “The Lives of Others

  1. Valid point

    And cities ( especially London ) are filled with security cameras

    But on the public road, you have little expectation of privacy. Someone could always include you in a photo when you were walking down Broadway. Police, always and correctly have monitored public places.

    Inside your own building, you should have that expectation of privacy. In a hotel, the electronic key lets the hotelier know when you leave or enter your room. I can absolutely see such technology in apartment blocks, where even the access to your own family housing unit is tracked, date and time stamped, 24/7 for marketing security purposes

  2. Paul beat me to this one.
    What about CCTV, what about mobile phones. Every move you make on the internet is tracked. The surveillance state isn’t on its way, it’s already here and it has been for quite a while.

  3. Correct also.

    But this is another step down a dangerous road.

    A surprising number of people don’t have smart phones, including some poor people or older people who have no desire to have them.

  4. I wouldn’t give a toss what the landlord does or sees. Why should I?
    This is all latter-day-hippy paranoia.

    The only problem would be, when you reach the car with your gang, you realise you’ve left your wallet on the table and get your child/friend/girlfriend to run back to fetch it.

    I know one often has a face-off with the girlfriend, but please…..

  5. There are no hippies in the building in question.

    The tenants are black middle class working people.

    No latte-sipping trendies from hell.

    They just don’t want to be tracked by a landlord and some data mining vendor.

  6. //They just don’t want to be tracked by the landlord.//

    Phantom, people take themselves far too seriously.

    Our lives are important to ourselves and to friends and family, but to nobody else.

    You simply have to learn to switch off when the corporate world is bombarding you with advertising, spam mail, sales telephone calls etc etc.
    They are already doing that. Pictures of your mug entering and leaving a building will hardly change anything.

  7. A second everything Noel said.

    In our modern society, privacy is just an illusion.

    Youtube and google track everything i do. But unlike many people my age i actually enjoy targeted ads, websites and videos. Stores and supermarkets track all my purchases, and target me with personalised vouchers and offers. Which I also appreciate. As Noel said, people take themselves and their privacy far too seriously.

  8. Strongly disagree on all points.

    Targeted ads creep me out. I will go well out of my way not to buy from those who do it.

    One of the major selling points of the soon to be rolled out Apple Credit Card is enhanced privacy. It is claimed that they and their bank partner -won’t- share any data to data miners, etc – a big deviation from current industry practice.

  9. “what about mobile phones. Every move you make on the internet is tracked.”

    I will admit to being quite shocked when I first looked at the timeline feature on google maps which had a history of where I had been (or more accurately where my android phone had been) almost all the time.

    “Targeted ads creep me out.”

    I work in IT and have at various times researched technical products and tools online and then have noticed that ads for those products start to pop up on numerous unrelated sites.

  10. I work in IT and have at various times researched technical products and tools online and then have noticed that ads for those products start to pop up on numerous unrelated sites.

    Me too.

    It’s not OK.

    They track you across devices of course as well. Very many will use as many as five devices in a week – work and home PC, Ipad, one or two phones.

    If you’re not concerned about this, you’re nuts.

  11. Fews

    I work in IT and have at various times researched technical products and tools online and then have noticed that ads for those products start to pop up on numerous unrelated sites.

    If you work in IT, you probably know how that works. and it has more to do with the device your browsing on, than the companies sharing data with each other.

  12. Cookies, and surreptious super cookies which the user didn’t ask to have, and which are designed in a way that makes them hard to impossible to remove from your machine.

  13. Phantom,

    Strongly disagree on all points.

    That’s fair enough, there is no right or wrong opinion on this.

    One of the major selling points of the soon to be rolled out Apple Credit Card is enhanced privacy. It is claimed that they and their bank partner -won’t- share any data to data miners, etc

    As I told you before Phantom, Apple are one of the worst companies for being able to do what they like with your personal data if you have an Apple account.
    They don’t need to sting you anymore with their credit card you’re already Apple’s bitch. 😂

    If you’re not concerned about this, you’re nuts.

    Why should I be concerned about it?

  14. Phantom,

    Cookies, and surreptious super cookies which the user didn’t ask to have, and which are designed in a way that makes them hard to impossible to remove from your machine.

    I can’t speak for all the browsers but on Chrome and the edge browsers, it’s not that difficult to block all cookies. In fact both these browsers can be made incredibly secure.

  15. I wouldn’t give a toss what the landlord does or sees. Why should I?

    Why should I be concerned about it?

    A friend of mine told me the only time they’d worry is if they were to frequently arrive home at five o’clock in the morning in a tired and emotional state.

  16. You assume that the landlord is the only party who will ever get that information.

    That won’t be how this works.

    And not everyone loves their landlord, either.

  17. //A friend of mine told me the only time they’d worry is if they were to frequently arrive home at five o’clock in the morning in a tired and emotional state.//

    But, Paul, I do that all the time.

    The only problem would be if I’m pictured coming back with my hands soiled after helping a friend paint his house red and it turns out there was a knifing just down the road.

  18. But, Paul, I do that all the time

    Great stuff Noel. My friend says it’s comforting to know that he’s not the only one that does it regularly nor the only one his neighbours tut and roll their eyes at when he says hello to them in the lift.

  19. I do wonder what the goal is. The fact that these are rent controlled apartments makes me think that it is being put in to prevent sub-letting or family members from taking over the tenancy without the legal ability to do so.

  20. Illegal sub-letting goes on all the time.

    In NY, family members can largely use the unit at will.

  21. With subletting you just give the subtenant your key. Now with this apartment you can’t do that. I think that is the real target, rather than any attempt to capture and monetise personal data.

  22. Good thought.

    But unless its illegal to do so, some landlords and companies will capture the data and sell it, if this technology becomes widespread, – unless sharing data becomes illegal

  23. Definitely. And tightening the rules on this is essential (there should definitely be a third party opt out, where the individual themselves gets to decide if the company can sell on or give their data to ta third party).

  24. People worry about government spying

    Corporate spying is to me at least as big a problem.

  25. Blacks won’t be getting through the door then – unless it’s a zoo:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5270891/Google-bans-word-gorilla-racist-Photos-app.html

    Google has been slammed for ‘fixing’ its racist image recognition algorithm by simply removing the word ‘gorilla’ from its auto-tag tool.

    The software outraged many users back in 2015 after it tagged images of a computer programmer and his friend as primates.

    Now, nearly three years later, it has been revealed the company has ‘fixed’ the issue by blocking identification of gorillas, chimpanzees and monkeys.

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