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The Way We Were

By ATWadmin On February 5th, 2009

THERE are those who’d have us believe that British society is pretty much unchanged these last few decades, that social mores and attitudes have always been just so. The argument amounts to attempted persuasion towards our ruling neo-Marxist terror, “accept it, life wasn’t much different in the past at all.” But then you read of the very recent past:

SIR – I trained at St Thomas’s Hospital in the late 1960s. Early morning prayers were led by the ward sister, with all the nurses kneeling, before duties began. We never had one complaint from patients.

Marjory Pook

Devizes, Wiltshire

 … and you’re reminded how wrong these people are. Our society has undergone a deep and profound revolution in an astonishingly short period of time.

And it’s not for the better.

15 Responses to “The Way We Were”

  1. "We never had one complaint from patients."

    Damn straight they didn’t. Nuns are scary.

  2. Nuns are’nt scary, but ward sisters were like RSMs.
    I’m thinking of Hatty Jaques.

  3. Bernard, nuns are scary as hell. I went to Catholic school, trust me on this one.

  4. Nuns?

  5. I’ll vouch for that. I was taught by nuns too in primary school. Vicious little cows some of them. Although to be fair there were some genuinely humane ones.

  6. Ps – I live quite close to St Thomas’ if it’s the one in London that is being referred to.

  7. ‘Vicious little cows some of them.’

    Frustration at not getting any of the bull !

    Come on now. Thats like something you would say yourself now isn’t it 🙂

  8. Al

    Believe me, you wouldn;t want to touch the stunted pug nosed little dwarf that used to spank my 7 year old arse !

  9. She sounds lovely, if not a little kinky !

  10. When I was in hospital last year, the chaplain came to my room daily. We prayed together and talked about Bible passages. He was Protestant and impressed by my the Biblical knowledge. This thing about scking nurses for praying is beyond me.

  11. Marjory Pook?!!

    Wonder if she really exists.

  12. The way we are:

    Where I lived when I was growing up my mum was seriously sick in hospital and of all the neighbours, including the regular devout little churchgoers who attended their masses every Sunday and with whom we had seemingly good neighbourly relations – the only people to show any concern at all were the muslims who lived at no 11. The woman turned up with cooked food for me and my father.

    We had nuns at my school too. One was terrifying but authority is important in a school. One left a lasting wonderful impression on me and I’ll never forget her. Rest in peace Sister Veronica.

  13. Consider this. If it had been a senior MALE doctor, or even an ordinary one that had offered to pray for this lady, would he have had the threat of dismissal?
    No of course not, but because it was a dispensable SRN female they could make an example of her; after all, there’s plenty more to take her place.
    Blatant NHS bullying by those pc bastards.

  14. Consider this. If it had been a senior MALE doctor, or even an ordinary one that had offered to pray for this lady, would he have had the threat of dismissal?
    No of course not, but because it was a dispensable SRN female they could make an example of her; after all, there’s plenty more to take her place.
    Blatant NHS bullying by those pc bastards.

    And your evidence for this is …?

  15. ….the GMC would have stepped in and scuppered the action, whereas it was public opinion that re-instated the nurse. So I’m making an educated guess that being female and without powerful representation, laid her open to victimisation.