23 1 min 9 yrs

abliarplane

 

 

Well, one just cannot just sit with the little people, especially when one’s done one’s bit to save the world; what; eh?

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23 thoughts on “And all that security; and those nasty queues, as well!

  1. Suitably painted to match his black heart.
    (My dictionary defines ‘blaggard’ as a corruption of the word blackheart)

  2. Does anybody recall the fake Kissinger search by the TSA to show that the ‘big’ people have to undergo the same invasions of personal privacy as ordinary people? That was pure theatre and was stated as so by me and others: this simply confirms it. The ‘rulers’ have their own planes, pilots, airfields indeed their own transport system – to keep themselves away from us.

  3. Frequent travelers can now sign up for TSA Pre Check which makes for a much easier experience at US airports.

    Those who take ten or more flights a year have already been vetted every which way, so this program makes a lot of sense.

  4. “Frequent travelers can now sign up for TSA Pre Check which makes for a much easier experience at US airports.”
    But then there would be no molestation by the TSA! I had little buckles on my capris when I went through security, which set off the alarms…so I had to go through a little touchy feely…I didn’t begrudge the TSA…I should have thought about what I was wearing and kept it simple. Re-entering the US was too long a wait for me…many international flights converged at once…so I’ll be signing up for the ‘easy pass’.

  5. I got the full patdown at Dublin Airport this past Tuesday. They said that I could keep my shoes on, I kept them on, and the metal in the shoes set off the alarm.

    Since I’m not Rand Paul, I wasn’t traumatized for life by the incident, and didn’t complain. If someone is trying to keep me from being blown up, I am very nice to them.

  6. “how many times did you guys re-elect him?”

    Unless we’re labour voters in his constituency, we didn’t. We don’t elect prime ministers.

    His Labour Party won three general elections. Including the none-of-the-aboves, Labour probably won no more than 25% of the vote in each, but it came to be the largest faction in the Commons, enabled partly because constituency boundaries are in its favour.

    The numbers show that Obama is more popular in the US than Blair ever was here, you commies.

  7. //Labour probably won no more than 25% of the vote in each//

    In Blair’s first victory his party won over 43 pc of the vote, above the average for British governments.

  8. Noel,

    You really must compare ‘like with like’, take your two ‘fact corrections’. The first referred to 25% of the total of those eligible to vote, the second figure referred to 46% of those who actualy voted.

    Even using your optimistic figure shows that Blair never really achieved a convincing majority. That it may well have been above the average for Brit governments, does nothing more than affirm the total apathy of the electorate, and makes a valid point for ‘a compulsory vote’.

    Phantom,

    Your comment re Brits ‘worshipping him like God’ shows the big differences between the north and the south of the country. When Blair was PM I was fortunate enough to reside in the South, in Florida, and the consensus of opinion was the opposite, we Brits, almost without exception, were gobsmacked and totally appalled at the adoration shown to Blair, who even in his early years was perceived in the UK as a total scumbag.

    It seems hard to believe that in ‘ultra savvy NY’ he was admired by Brits.

  9. Noel Cunningham –

    That’s on a turnout of 70%.

    Over the subsequent two elections Labour won 24% and 21% of the total vote, giving an average over the three elections of 25%.

  10. Ernest

    I think that may have been a tongue in cheek comment by Phantom.

    With regard to the percentage voting, no UK party for generations if indeed ever, has won the support of the majority of the electorate or even the majority of those who turned out to vote. All administrations, including Mrs T at the height of her power operated with the majority of the population either actively or apathetically not supporting them.

  11. //All administrations, including Mrs T at the height of her power operated with the majority of the population either actively or apathetically not supporting them.//

    Exactly, and I can’t imagine how Pete and Ernest will get far with Troll using that turnout argument as, by the same standards, his demi-god was elected president in 1980 with only 51 pc of the total vote on a turnout of 52 pc. The turnout is set only in relation to the total eligible electorate – not including adults not registered to vote – which was about 70 pc at the time in the US.
    So by P’s and E’s calculation, Reagan was elected by only around 18 pc of adults in the States.

  12. Sure, governing parties don’t win a majority of the votes, but I was only disabusing Troll of the idea that Blair was popular. He wasn’t, and not by a long way.

    I see that presidential elections tend to have pretty low turnouts today, making the 1980 numbers about average. The lowest recent turnout was in 1996, when Bill the Rapist got 49% of a 49% turnout.

    Well, that’s what was allocated to him anyway.

    Blair and Clinton were portrayed as more popular than this by the press. Clinton was funky and groovy, the jazz-playing first black president and all that propaganda. The numbers show that in 1996 3 out of 4 voters didn’t vote for him.

  13. Noel

    To be fair to Ernest and Pete, I doubt if they would be claiming any greater electoral legitimacy for the Thatcher or Reagan administrations. However our respective electoral systems allocate seats according to FPTP irrespective of turnout and all governments have full legitimacy if they can win the majority of seats or in the case of Presidential elections – College votes, accordingly.

  14. //I see that presidential elections tend to have pretty low turnouts today, making //

    It’s strange actually that turnout in Obama elections is relatively high, the highest since JFK won in 1960.

    //To be fair to Ernest and Pete, I doubt if they would be claiming any greater electoral legitimacy for the Thatcher or Reagan Administrations//

    To be fair to me, I never said they were.

  15. While Blair may not have been popular he certainly enjoyed more popularity than his adversaries.

    The main article, while slanted against him, does point to the fact that ex-world leaders can quite often profit to an extraordinary degree following their term in office. Usually they do so in the guise of some charity-like foundation, but while there may be some benefit to the world never mistake the fact that these folks are getting rich (look at the Clintons for the prime example).

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