75 2 mins 9 yrs

Once again, the BBC allows itself to be used as a mouthpiece by alleged terrorists;

Prison officers have reacted with fury to claims from Woolwich murder suspect Michael Adebolajo that he was ‘assaulted’ while in prison. The man accused of hacking to death Fusilier Lee Rigby in the street was involved in a violent incident in Belmarsh high security jail last week in which he lost two teeth. In an interview with BBC News over the weekend, Adebolajo’s brother Jeremiah claimed warders in the prison ‘took offence’ when the remand prisoner refused to obey an instruction and then ‘smashed his head against a window’. The BBC also reported the claim – denied by Prison Service officials – that the murder suspect had been denied medical treatment.  Officials insisted he had refused to be seen by a doctor. The report also claimed the suspension of five officers involved in the incident was ‘exceptional’, and hinted the assault might have been the result of Adebolajo’s ‘notoriety’.  But yesterday the prison officers’ union condemned reporting of the incident as a ‘circus’. And sources suggested the officers had felt threatened after Adebolajo refused to comply with orders and turned towards them aggressively.

Adebolajo. Aggressive? Surely not?

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The BBC seems utterly determined to make us sympathise with Adebolajo in particular and Islam in general. Allowing itself to be used as a vehicle to impugn the reputation of the Prison officers concerned seems so natural a thing for the BBC to do.

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75 thoughts on “JIHAD’S LITTLE HELPERS…?

  1. Once again, the BBC allows itself to be used as a mouthpiece by alleged terrorists

    There’s an alleged assault and the brother of the man accused of murder who was allegedly assaulted explains a version of events?

    I suppose that freedom of speech, so beloved by ATW, is only applicible to some?

  2. The brother of the ( ahem ) accused gives his spin.

    Well, there’s an objective source for you.

  3. So, freedom of speech should be curtailed then?

    Maybe the cop’s story , whose alleged attempted strangulation in Paris the other day, shouldn’t be carried on the news either?

  4. The brother of the ” Accused ” was not

    So, only first – hands news accounts should be carried then?

  5. yes this sweet god loving man would never instigate anything while he is still in prison and not running for office. And his brother of course being another man of deep faith would never lie… oh wait their religion gives bonus virgins to those that lie best to the infidel, I forgot.

    They can say whatever they want Paul giving what they say weight and credence is what the BBC and you are doing.

    So when he gets free from his oppressive false imprisonment are you going to help with his campaign for office? I mean c’mon he represents an oppressed group of people by the crown. What he did was a justified response. We can put him and Adams on the same ticket.

  6. They can say whatever they want Paul giving what they say weight and credence is what the BBC and you are doing

    So, again Troll, Should free speech, so beloved by ATW, be curtailed to those who we agree with?

    So when he gets free from his oppressive false imprisonment are you going to help with his campaign for office?

    Troll, maybe it’s too much coffee but you can talk some absolute shit.

    This ‘man’ is quite clearly guilty of a horrific murder but until his guilt is established by the judicial system he is officially ‘the accused’ One part of the judicial system is the duty of care the system has to anyone in it’s custody.

    That’s the issue at stake here.

  7. Paul,
    You are being very argumentative on this particular item. Your passion would have nothing to do with past experiences would it?

    I have had to restrain children/teenagers who were practically raving, they were so angry. You perhaps would not believe the strength of a person when they are seriously agit8ed.
    People get hurt. I got hurt! I had a tendon snapped and there were four of us trying to restrain one girl.
    In this case we KNOW the guy helped butcher an unarmed man in the street. Had Lee Rigby been an animal, we would have said he was slaughtered there on the street.
    Now whilst we agree that people have to act according to the law, including prison officers (or screws if you prefer) people do get hurt in violent restraints or physical confrontations.
    I personally doubt very much that prison officers would risk their jobs by deliberately assaulting the man, but perhaps you can prove otherwise?

  8. Paul,
    You are being very argumentative on this particular item. Your passion would have nothing to do with past experiences would it?

    Why would it have anything to do with my ‘past experiences?’

    You either believe in the rule of law and free speech or you don’t.

  9. Morning Paul.
    How the Dickens are you?
    Yes I believe in those things but I also believe that some people are extremely adept at using it against you.
    For example I believe that those convicted of seriously anti-social crimes against a person or the public (murder terrorism abuse) gave up their social rights when they committed the crime.
    Furthermore I hope that our penal system toughens up and stops putting the rights of the criminal before the rights of the victim.

  10. For example I believe that those convicted of seriously anti-social crimes against a person or the public (murder terrorism abuse) gave up their social rights when they committed the crime.

    Convicted? Adebolajo hasn’t been convicted of anything yet much less his brother.

    However, believe what you wish, (there are some here who believe in a Jewish conspiracy to take over the world), as what you believe is superfluous to the realities of the penal system which has a duty of care to every prisoner in that system.

    IF this ‘man’ has been assaulted then there should be a proper investigation and anyone found guilty of the assault should be punished accordingly.

    As I said, you either believe in free speach and the rule of law or you don’t.

  11. “As I said, you either believe in free speach and the rule of law or you don’t.”

    But without wishing (really!) to offend, would you apply those same absolutes to the rule of law in Northern Ireland? To the parades and demos for example.
    I think not Paul.
    I believe in the law, but the law can be used against true justice can’t it? In fact my old memory stirs to a discussion perhaps a year or two ago talking about our legal system in which a lawyer defends people he knows to be guilty, and I said true justice would allow a lawyer to refuse a case on the grounds that he believes his prospective client to be guilty. You disagreed with me.
    Can you remember that one?

  12. The media should report claims of abuse. Even when the prisoner is clearly evil there are basic rights that are long standing. The reports should acknowledge that a claim is not proof. Given the high profile it is more likely that he is being treated with absolute care than he is subject to any abuse.

  13. But without wishing (really!) to offend, would you apply those same absolutes to the rule of law in Northern Ireland? To the parades and demos for example.
    I think not Paul

    I think you’re incorrect there Agi but if you’d like to give specifics I’ll gladly debate the point.

  14. Absolutely correct Mahons. I have consistently stated that the claims of assault should be investigated and if anyone found guilty they should be punished accordingly.

    *Ps Agi, is that my Irish obsession manifesting itself again in your 2.37?

  15. – Although what a further penalty to someone almost certainly facing a minimum thirtyish year tariff is I’m not sure.

  16. this man is NOT the accused. He is the self confessed and witnessed by dozens murderer. He should have been gunned down in the street like the mad dog that he is.

    The accused indeed. You call it talking shit, we call it instant consequences.

  17. Paul- well depending on the infraction a prisoner can lose certain things (visiting rights, books etc) which are withdrawn for bad behavior.

  18. I think suitable additional punishment for a Muslim “holy warrior”, would be to have to listen for 5 hours a day to a tape of well meaning hospital visitors who “sing” hymns to the patients. I specifically mean those whose intentions far far succeed their ability.

  19. I’m not sure how much of a punative effect that would on someone almost certainly facing a massive number of years in jail with in all probability having to spend a high quantity of that in isolation.

    Although subjecting him to continuous Beach Boys ‘tunes’ while incarcerated may be considered inhuman.

  20. Paul – Who knows, he’s bonkers to begin with. But when someone is serving a long sentence then privileges that we might see as minimal are quite significant to them.

  21. Troll

    this man is NOT the accused. He is the self confessed and witnessed by dozens murderer. He should have been gunned down in the street like the mad dog that he is.

    I think the police had a crack at that.

  22. Paul,
    “I think you’re incorrect there Agi but if you’d like to give specifics I’ll gladly debate the point.”

    Wasn’t there a time when we discussed the issue of lawyers defending clients and if said that if they knew the client was guilty they shouldn’t have to defend them? That wasn’t the nub of the thread but it was an offspin.
    I won’t go into it any more because it may be a memory failure thing again.
    However having stated your absolute belief in the rule of law, haven’t there been instances when you have questioned the law (a la British law) in relation to events in Northern Ireland?

  23. A belief in the rule of law doesn’t mean one believes the legal system always abides by it.

  24. I believe the situation was I suggested that it was a lawyers professional duty to use all legal resources at his disposal for the best result for his client once he had accepted the case?

    Haven’t there been instances when you have questioned the law (a la British law) in relation to events in Northern Ireland?

    Absolutely there have. If certain legal decisions hadn’t been questioned miscarriages of justice like the Guilford Four, Birmingham Six, Judith Ward, Pat Kane, Danny McNamee cases would never have come to light.

    However, whar they have to do with this particular case I don’t know.

  25. Defending the guilty as any criminal defense lawyer will tell you is far easier than defending the innocent. We are lucky in our system that the vast majority going to trial are guilty, you couldn’t sleep at night worrying about keeping an innocent out of jail.

  26. ” I believe the situation was I suggested that it was a lawyers professional duty to use all legal resources at his disposal for the best result for his client once he had accepted the case?”

    Yes that sounds like it. I just can’t remember how far back that was. (One of the difficulties of aging is that events either recede so far back you can’t hang it on anything; or else you think it happened quite recently!)
    Anyway at least I remembered it was you.

    So going back to the rule of law, if we accept for example that a government makes unpopular laws does your absolutist approach advocate still obeying them or do we only obey laws that are popular?

  27. Agit, some bad laws are not only unjust but immoral: Rosa Parkes having to give up he front of the bus seat to a white passenger or the racial segregation of Apartheid in South Africa being two international examples. However unpopular laws are not always unjust laws.

    Look, if you would cut to the chase and tell where this is going regarding the Adebolajo case and his alleged assault while in custody it would save a lot of time.

  28. the victim had just came from a military barracks, cops were there, military guards were there, people were there. I’m sorry but Over Here someone out of that group would have been armed, and they wouldn’t have waited for officers to come and try to WOUND him.

  29. Had to stop Petr.
    the wife was getting too excited
    And the neighbours said it was disgusting to iron clothes outside…
    How are you anyway?
    You must be very busy. Your output has dropped considerably.

    But tell the wife it is treatable …
    🙂

  30. Troll –

    Major Hasan?

    Fusilier Rigby had left Woolwich Barracks and was walking along the street in civvies and unarmed. There were no police or armed military around.

  31. Judging by the interviews on Sky News, every American tourist in London is outside Buck Palace tonight.

  32. lol Agie — All good here, thanks! I’m doing long days working and working on some more of my own stuff at home. I’m trying to cut out distractions to be greatest extent possible!

  33. It appears that it is more than Allan who doesn’t know the meaning of basic words.

  34. on such an historic day

    David will have 2 reasons to celebrate this day, the birth of the young fella in London, and this:

    July 22nd, 1977 – Elvis Costello’s first album, “My Aim Is True,” was released in Britain. It was later released in the U.S.

    🙂

  35. The baby is the heir apparent to the heir apparent to the heir apparent. Prince Harry has been relegated to being the heir presumptive to the heir apparent to the heir apparent to the heir apparent from being the heir presumptive to the heir apparent to the heir apparent … apparently.

    First in the line of apparents ever for his gender to be immaterial re succeeding.

    The Queen apparently was never heir apparent. I wonder if she would have been if the Queen Mother had been 70 when the King died.

    Also what would have happened if she had been pregnant when the King died? Would it have been “The King is dead, Watch this space”.

  36. //Experience the atmosphere on such an historic day//

    Oh my. That’s like the Californians screwing in a light bulb.

    I saw it on TV. There were hundreds of people there experiencing the back of the heads of the people in front of them. But all will be able to say they were there, or something.

    Still, it isn’t the child’s fault he was born into such self-conscious nonsense. Let’s all wish him and mother nothing but the best.

  37. The monarchy doesn’t harm anyone.

    If you want other people to respect what’s important to you, you may want to consider respecting what’s important to them.

    It’s a fine day and good luck to them all.

    Noel, one of my sisters has requested that I bring back a souvenir of the occasion. Should I give her an all knowing lecture and refuse to do it? Tell her its a nonsense?

  38. It was great to be part of the crowd for the wedding and not just watching it on TV. Actually seeing the carriages past and chatting to strangers near by. Some of the outfits and hats of the crowd were a wonder to behold. It was also great fun to hear all the messages relayed through the crowd from those who also had laptops or received phone calls from home. My friend was on the phone to her hubby when Kate got out of her carriage. “It is a white dress”, she announced excitedly to those around her. Then we heard her saying to her hubby, “you’re sure it is white and not cream”. Then we had the “no we’re not sure after all it it is white”. Poor Martin had no idea the precision required for his job.

    It was also great to go round to the Palace for the balcony scene.

    It was interesting to see it all on the DVD but being amongst the crowd, picnic with bubbly laid down a much better memory.

  39. The only thing I envy the baby for is that he will have the opportunity to know so much about so many of his ancestors.

    Although there are probably thousands who are direct descendants of George III and thus most of the characters before him on the throne (and those who tried to take it).

  40. Aileen

    I suspected that it was for the reason you stated, but I was just curious.

    Personally, not being a royalist, I couldn’t care less, really, other than to extend my own best wishes to the new parents. I just don’t get this fascination with standing outside the gates of a big house, waving a flag. I don’t mean that to appear disrespectful to your beliefs, and I apologise if that’s how it comes across. I just don’t get it.

    For a start, the mother and child aren’t even there, are they? It wasn’t like a ‘home birth?’ In fact, if it was, then surely it’s a home birth at the mother-in-law’s…

    Ok, that bit does look disrespectful. Apologies again.

    I hope the weather cools down sufficiently for you in the next day or two, so you can be there 🙂

  41. //The monarchy doesn’t harm anyone.//

    I wasn’t talking about the monarchy or this couple or the birth or whatever.

    Just about the media frenzy and the hype. For me, a birth is something warm and intimate, and doesn’t bear public gawking. Mind you, some time ago there used to be about 40 peope present to witness royal births in England, including the Prime Minister. They were there to make sure that no-one sneaked in some other child to pretend he was the hairless heir, and that the baby born was the genuine article.

    But people standing around in the sun for hours just waiting for an announcement? It reminded me of the crowds in St Peter’s Square waiting for the famous white smoke; but at least with the a new pope there is some kind of news, it can be one of 80 or so cardinals. They also know that the man of the moment is in there somewhere. With a birth, the only news really is if it’s a boy or a girl, and in London the baby and mother were nowhere near the place.

    Maybe it will be easier for you if you simply show your sister this:

    http://jeffreyhill.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341d417153ef017c344b219b970b-800wi

  42. Seimi

    There was nothing disrespectful about your post.

    As to the key players not being there, the crowd brings the atmosphere. I am actually disappointed that they had that easel thing this time. I loved the idea of the announcement tied to the gates. There is something paradoxically prosaic about it.

    Thanks re the weather. I wonder how long the easel stays. The weather is expected to break tomorrow 🙂

  43. It was also great to go round to the Palace for the balcony scene.
    It was interesting to see it all on the DVD but being amongst the crowd, picnic with bubbly laid down a much better memory.

    Millions of Americans, incl. very many with no British connection at all, would give anything to see that in person.

    Its a bit of magic in a world that doesn’t have nearly enough of it.

    Long may it run.

  44. Phantom

    Where my group was sitting during the wedding, there were a few different nations represented near us. There was a family with their Stars ‘n Stripes. One of the TV crews was American looking out for their own to interview. There were also three young Italian women behind me and as it turned out one of the was married to a NI man. I fed them cheese and biscuits and they shared a wee (Union Flag) cup of my bubbly. It was great fun.

  45. I am glad for them and glad they had a healthy delivery. Imagine being 24 hours old and already being an international celebrity.

  46. I have seen so many comment about this being the first time that there have been three successors in line since 1894.

    That isn’t right. it’s since 1901.

    1894 was when Edward VII was born but Queen Victoria didn’t until 1901 so that is the right date.

  47. ” Personally, not being a royalist, I couldn’t care less, really, other than to extend my own best wishes to the new parents. I just don’t get this fascination with standing outside the gates of a big house, waving a flag. I don’t mean that to appear disrespectful to your beliefs, and I apologise if that’s how it comes across. I just don’t get it.”

    Seimi,

    Personally, being a r(R)oyalist I agree with you.
    I am a r(R)oyalist because for all its faults it has served this country well, and I remain unconvinced that any other system has any greater advantages.
    My reason for posting the baby’s birth was because we all know about William and Kate, and as a proud recent great uncle I can imagine how thrilled the couple must be, as any other young couple would at the birth of their first child.

    That’s it.

    I have high hopes that the younger generation of Royals will get rid of all the stuffiness, snobbery and “privilege”, whilst retaining the Queen’s sense of responsibility and service to the nation.
    I’ve been to a Buckingham Palace tea party (although it was the wife who got invited). I’m pleased to have had the opportunity, but that’s it. As I have said before I don’t regard anyone better than me. They may occupy a more important and influential role in society, but that’s different.

    I think the increasingly emotional and hysterical British press have a lot to answer for….

  48. Seimi

    Just pondering your post and the bit

    I don’t mean that to appear disrespectful to your beliefs

    To be honest the celebration emotion is more to do with my interest in the Royal Family as a family and the continuation of that line than being a monarchist. I watch historical dramas or factual programmes with one train of thought going – that’s the Queen’s great great ….. Or if it’s Charles II – “that’s William’s great …”

    I am a monarchist too but the main beliefs at play here are that it would be fun to be down at Buck House.

  49. From a young man being almost decpitated on a London street in broad daylight to a child being born into a privileged family.

    Panem et circenses anyone?

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