38 1 min 2 yrs

A 14-year-old boy is better off living in Sierra Leone than in the UK, a High Court judge has ruled.

The teenager was taken to Freetown as his mother was worried about his involvement in county lines gangs in London after he was excluded from school.

A civil case was brought at the High Court by her estranged husband

Da gang crime is so rife, da schools are so crap, and da culture so base and violent, that a judge has ruled his mother should keep him in Sierra Leone for his own good.

Let that sink in.

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38 thoughts on “LONDON: WORSE THAN A THIRD WORLD CRAPHOLE

  1. London is a big place the last time I looked.

    It’s all worse than Sierra Leone?

  2. Paul

    It isn’t even worth responding to this nonsense. London is a great fine first class city. What do you think Pete’s answer would be if he was required to either live in London or Sierra Leone?

  3. I know Americans who live there now, for a time.

    They’re very happy there, experiencing on of the great world cities.

    But I suppose if you have a uniformly negative attitude, everything is Sierra Leone.

  4. It shouldn’t suprise anyone that parts of Sierra Leone are better than parts of London, or that parts of the worst place could be better than parts of the best. There’s practically no large city without safe and comfortable areas with good services – usually, but not necessarily, the places where the wealthy and diplomats etc live.

    In this case, the boy in London would have had to go to a special school and was being pressurised by gangs into acting as their drug courier. In Sierra Leone, he will be living with his grandmother who’s a police officer and will probably be brought up more strictly than in the UK. The judge also looked at the school curriculum in SL and it compared favourably with that in London, e.g. in SL he’ll also be learning Chinese; back home he’d be learning gangsta rap.

    Those countries aren’t all gloomy. In general I often think many, many kids are better off in the developing, maybe even the 3rd world. I know several kids from Asia, Iran, Arab countries, and even young kids have a kind of old-fashioned commitment to learning and science that’s almost impossible to find in the West today. There’s also often better social integration, bigger families, fewer kids being spoiled etc. In many societies the old expect and get respect and the young expect and get discipline; ultimately that makes everyone happier.

  5. There’s practically no large city without safe and comfortable areas with good services

    That’s true. Sometimes on Twitter I see anti-Palestinian people posting a picture of a fancy cafeé or mall in Gaza, presented without comment. They think it proves that Gazans in fact live in the lap of luxury! There are problems in Gaza, grave ones, but there still remains a small minority that live *relatively* well.

    I know several kids from Asia, Iran, Arab countries, and even young kids have a kind of old-fashioned commitment to learning and science that’s almost impossible to find in the West today.

    I have had long conversations with teens and young adults in places like Vietnam, Iran, Bosnia. In some ways their lives are limited and prospects grim. Unemployment is rampant, pay low, corruption high etc etc. In other ways, however, their lives are productive and less stressful. You also will find an admirable commitment to education and learning in these places with young people often speaking several languages and having qualifications coming out their ears. Many fast food workers, cashiers etc, in Iran have masters degrees, for example.

    the old expect and get respect and the young expect and get discipline; ultimately that makes everyone happier

    Yes, this too. Something that has moved in the wrong direction in ‘the West’.

  6. Noel

    A thoughful and sensible reply to the simplistic baiting that Pete indulges in this post. The judge was of course making a decision about a real person’s life with all the unique familial and social circumstances pertaining to that case. Pete of course used it to just make a silly sweeping and fake (in the sense that he doesnt believe it himself) generalised conclusion.

  7. Colm,

    It isn’t even worth responding to this nonsense. London is a great fine first class city. What do you think Pete’s answer would be if he was required to either live in London or Sierra Leone?

    You’re taking Pete to seriously mate, take advice from this guy:

    Not buying it Dave. Your responses to Pete are too serious. To prove you are not falling for his schtick You need to comment in a style of sticking your tongue out ,making rude gestures with your hands , and mooning at him 🙂

  8. Da gang crime is so rife, da schools are so crap, and da culture so base and violent,

    Mostly in Southwark, Lambeth. Brent, Haringey and Hackney.

    It’s a black ting.

  9. Dave

    Yes, I forgot my own rule. I am now dropping my trousers and turning my arse towards Pete as we speak…

    Yes, OK I know what that could also imply !!

  10. I know several kids from Asia, Iran, Arab countries, and even young kids have a kind of old-fashioned commitment to learning and science that’s almost impossible to find in the West today.

    That’s a great observation and in my experience a very true comment, Noel.

  11. I often notice how a lot of people on the conservative side of the fence tend to see the world like in those school atlases – coloured fields indicating countries as if it were all one homogenous lump with relatively similar people. Travel tells you something very different.

    //You also will find an admirable commitment to education and learning in these places with young people often speaking several languages and having qualifications coming out their ears//

    Indeed. Through our Tunisian lodger I’ve met several of her mates: young, bright, studying engineering and computer subjects. I also know about half a dozen Iranians, kids and young adults. Without an exception, they have an incredibly strong study-work ethic. They have the degree of concentration and endurance that you find in someone with a balanced and relaxed mind. All of them also work in low-paying jobs on the side.

    But most impressive of all is that they are not only excellent in their chosen fields, but also have a wide knowledge of history and literature etc. The 3 Tunisian girls all read French philosophy as a kind of relaxation. I thought they were bluffing and we talked a little about the bit that I’ve read. But I soon shut up as I didn’t want to display my shortcomings in front of my family. They even know Irish literature. It’s incredible, and it’s IMO the one thing that distinguishes them from their counterparts in the west. How many computer nerds can talk easily about the similarities between Arabic, Turkish and Persian?

    These people are all of educated upper-middle-class backgrounds, yes. But travelling, say, in India you also encounter people like that old guy selling tickets in a grimy train station. When he finds out where you’re from he starts chatting away about GB Shaw. You find that kind of thing everywhere. People in poorer countries are hungry for knowledge, for them knowledge is a kind of privilege, in a way that you don’t often find in the West.

  12. I was at a bus stop in Bangkok one day. Foreigners rarely take the buses as taxis and tuk-tuks cost next to nothing anyway. Waiting at the bus stop an older Thai man struck up a conversation with me, lowering his mask (the air pollution is lethal) to ask me where I was from. This was mid-1990s and he ended up opining on the Irish peace process of all things, knowing an amazing amount about all the major players and issues at play… all in the Queen’s English I might add.

  13. I often notice how a lot of people on the conservative side of the fence tend to see the world like in those school atlases – coloured fields indicating countries as if it were all one homogenous lump with relatively similar people.

    I feel as though I have spent most of my life arguing against this approach: “The Arabs”, “The Arab World”, “The Muslim World”, “The Irish”, “Islam”, “The Jews” etc. These groups, to the extent they event exist in any real sense, or so broad and diverse as to render conclusions based on them patently absurd.

    More recently, it’s “white people”, “straight white men”, “people of colour” and so on, as if these are discrete, coherent groups and can be relied upon to think and act collectively. It’s madness.

  14. Yes, the linguistic abilities, closely connected with other forms of intellectual capacity, of Johnny Foreigner can be very impressive.

    Petr, if you don’t mind me asking how old are you? I have an image in my mind’s eye of you being comparitively young.

  15. I’ve been to Vietnam and to Bali and other places.

    Even as a western tourist, and even when you are primarily in touristy places, your perceptions of ” foreign ” countries change.

    Leaving any comment on the governments aside, in both places, I saw people who were generally far poorer than anyone here, but were polite, neatly dressed, who appeared to be healthy, where you saw well behaved young children in uniforms going to and from school, who waved at you as you drove by ( even if the parents likely had not been to school ).

    There can be the perception that much of the world is a violent starving hellhole, and I didn’t see that in those places. Didn’t see that in China either.

    Hundreds of millions of people in those worlds have a life that is perfectly fine, a life off the charts better than their grandparents had, just as many of us live a life that it off the charts better than the lives that our great grandparents may have had.

  16. It wouldn’t be unusual to meet a random person on the street in Iran who speaks impeccable English, yet has never lived abroad or conversed much with native speakers. That’s impressive.

  17. I’d like to visit Iran.

    Doubt that it can ever happen – Americans can only visit with minders there – but if things change, I would go.

    It is an interesting place.

    I was within a few miles of it, as transiting the strait of Hormuz.

  18. //I’d like to visit Iran.
    Doubt that it can ever happen//

    It will. It’ll probably happen much sooner than you think.

    An increasingly educated population, serial failures of the government, the falling price of oil, overpopulated cities, Corona … sooner or later something’s going to break.

  19. It is an interesting place and one of the safer places I’ve visited. Iran is vast and there are a couple of border areas where travel is not advised, but the rest of the country is safe to visit. People are friendly and welcoming and you are very unlikely to come across anything that could credibly be described as extremism or anti-West.

  20. An increasingly educated population, serial failures of the government, the falling price of oil, overpopulated cities, Corona … sooner or later something’s going to break.

    This is a longer conversation but I would disagree that that is inevitable. Despite all the things you mention, the ‘regime’ (if you want to call it that) enjoys considerable legitimacy.

  21. That regime fight to the last Iranian to keep it’s power.

    I’d like to see a democratic flowering of some kind there, but I’m not counting on it.

  22. I’d love to visit Iran. So much history. Not really a family holiday location, yet. But some day…

  23. It would be for the adventurous cultural tourist.

    But if you’re an American, that government would think that you’re a spy, so no thanks.

  24. Oh my life!

    I know several kids from Asia, Iran, Arab countries, and even young kids have a kind of old-fashioned commitment to learning and science that’s almost impossible to find in the West today […]

    the old expect and get respect and the young expect and get discipline; ultimately that makes everyone happier

    Yes, this too. Something that has moved in the wrong direction in ‘the West’

    The radicals have noticed that conservative societies, based on natural human values, have something going for them. T’is a pity that they trashed Western Civilisation first, but Heaven welcomes all sinners.

  25. Conservative societies, based on natural human values

    You mean they’re not third world uncivilised, barabaric shitholes?

    I really wish you’d make your mind up which way the wind is blowing Pete.

  26. shitholes?

    One of the ten thousand uglinesses that the fake president is responsible for is the normalization of that word.

    When he croaks, his diseased carcass should be interred 1000 feet below the Chernobyl reactor

  27. When he croaks, his diseased carcass should be interred 1000 feet below the Chernobyl reactor

    Wow!

    That is taking Trump Derangement Syndrome to a whole new level of mental illness.

  28. You mean they’re not third world uncivilised, barabaric shitholes?

    Oh they are that, thanks to the socialist policies they had foistered on them by left win Western imperialists.

    In 1945 Hong Kong was in a far worse state than India. Hong Kong followed a path of free markets and economic liberalism. India copied the socialist policies of Clement Attlee and stayed with them for decades. The results speak for themselves.

    Nevertheless, it is welcome to see the commies in here recognise the cultural damage that their social policies have wrought on Western Civilisation.

    If you’d like to pen a mea culpa I will ensure it gets posted up.

  29. When he croaks, his diseased carcass should be interred 1000 feet below the Chernobyl reactor

    Can you imagine what they’d think of President Trump if he killed thousands and thousands of elderly, like Cuomo and other Democrat governors?

    (I can’t wait for that post about how Cuomo killed thousands of elderly people in NY).

  30. Third world uncivilised, barabaric shitholes populated by conservative societies, based on natural human values.

    Verbal contortionism.

    Phantom, in all fairness I heard the term shithole in common usage long before the dolt in the Oval Office used it.

  31. I don’t think that you heard it from presidents and prime ministers.

    Not like this.

    He was born with the silver spoon in his mouth, but with no class at all.

  32. No, but according to some it’s his unpresidential entertainment which makes hime great.

  33. Yes.

    He doesn’t speak like that for effect, the way a combat general might. He speaks that way because he thinks that way. He can’t do it any other way.

    Right Pete? Nice headline 🙂

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