12 3 mins 11 yrs

Let’s start with a quote from the great man, Plato.

“Democracy passes into despotism.”

So, how are his 21st century fellow Greeks getting on in that former cradle of civilisation?  Well, they are out there on the streets protesting, rioting, threatening to hang the Prime Minister.

Why? Because Greece decided to try and join a currency union that would lend it €€€billions in exchange for it broadly accepting the fiscal prudence and rigour of Germany. It had no intention whatsoever of ever doing this, of course, and whilst it spent like money was going out of fashion, it turns out that it is Greece that is going out of fashion as the prospect of Sovereign Default looms closer day by day.

The EU pipers now call the tune in Greece and demand all sorts of cuts and austerity. Yesterday, the Greek Parliament voted for a new and controversial new property tax bill, first announced earlier this month, that aims to boost revenues. Anyone who does not pay the new tax risks having their power cut off. The lights are literally going out across Greece and we may not see them on again in our lifetime. Still, the sun shines quite a lot.

The Greek State, encouraged by the EU, is threatening its people with all sorts of punishment. The total state of detachment between the politicians and the people is there for all who have eyes to see.  And in a sense this is the fulfilment of the European ideal – central planners telling puppet Parliaments what they must do. Greece is gone so far that it cannot be saved. It must leave the EU and look forward to a century of continued decay and demographic death. But what happens in Greece today will transfer to all those OTHER EU Nations that thought there was such a thing as a free lunch. There never is. The price for Euro-roubles was Euro-despotism and I am sure had you been in Athens last night, you would be under no illusions. You can have freedom or you can have the Euro.

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

12 thoughts on “PLATO’S CHILDREN

  1. Socialism, the great evener. Sorry all you ideologues who really believe Socialism is the instant cure for all of mankind’s maladies. It surely does not.

    And the current

    Greek tragedy proves that Socialism may be the great seducer for the pleasure -seeking, instant gratification uneducated and undisciplined, but there’s a time when the financial cornucopia belches out nothing but putrid air.

    The peasants, like the adult-children they are cannot understand nor accept reality. And like real children, who have been denied access to their sacred toys, they’re going to throw a tantrum.

    The Greeks have reached the boiling point. They are being asked to be responsible after years of being spoilt by a government which sought to make them happy in their world of materialistic lust.

    Who is next? Portugal? Ireland? Italy? Spain?

    Of course, the Mediterranean countries have the reputation for volatility, but the Irish might just surprise the world and go off the deep end first. We’ve all witnessed the propensity for violence en masse during recent St. Patrick’s Day events in Dublin. Could the Green fields run red with blood?

    Only time will tell, of course. But the clock is ticking and the time is running out for the puppets of Brussels.

  2. “The price for Euro-roubles was Euro-despotism and I am sure had you been in Athens last night, you would be under no illusions. You can have freedom or you can have the Euro.”

    This is all very childish. While the EU – through the ECB – allowed member states borrow at a certain rate – there was certainly never any obligation on anyone to borrow, nor to waste the borrowed money. In fact, Greece repeatedly broke its promises and failed in its obligations for better financial management.
    All this guff about EU “despotism” is as silly as the bankrupt gambler complaining that the bank that lent him the money now insists he manage his affairs better.

    Greece was always and remains free to leave the EU at any time, yes, even free to stop borrowing! It will do neither. That Greece stays in the EU is by far a more population proposition in Greece (around 75 p.c. in favour, I hear) than in any other EU country.

    BTW – Plato was agruing with that phrase that democracy is a crazy idea and that benign dictatorship is preferable. Do you agree with him?

    “Socialism may be the great seducer for the pleasure -seeking, instant gratification uneducated and undisciplined, but there’s a time when the financial cornucopia belches out nothing but putrid air.”

    Eddie, “Socialism”, according to your use of the term, also covers Norway, Denmark, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, etc…

    Are they really all that putrid, or even less prosperous, than the state you live in?
    Tell us where that happy place is.

  3. “Otmar Issing, former chief economist of the massively undercapitalized hedge fund known as the European Central Bank, has told Stern magazine that “Greece will find it “impossible” to get back on its feet even after the country implements austerity measures and it is inevitable that Greece will have to leave the euro-zone. He added that Greece needs a debt haircut of at least 50%, and even so preventing contagion will be very complicated. His biggest warning pertains to the deus ex machina which everyone knows is the last thing up Europe’s sleeve: the prospect of issuing Eurobonds (aka the suicide button for any German ruler at the time when these are implemented). To wit: “Eurobonds will prove the gravedigger of a stable euro.”

    Link here

  4. Great post, David.

    Noel, setting aside your interesting comment about the Plato quote, your argument, paraphrased: “hey, it ain’t so bad in Luxembourg etc. (so stop complaining)” — does not hold up on any level.

  5. “your argument, paraphrased: “hey, it ain’t so bad in Luxembourg etc. (so stop complaining)” — does not hold up on any level.”

    Patty, even if one were to paraphrase it thus, it still does hold against Eddie’s – and your own – constant refrain that “socialism” doesn’t work.

    The countries I mentioned certainly do work, or at least work as well as other non-“socialist” countries. If you – or Eddie – can tell us what or where the latter happy places in the developed world may be, we can compare.

    Well…..?

  6. ” And in a sense this is the fulfilment of the European ideal – central planners telling puppet Parliaments what they must do. ”

    Absolutely right. Here is an unelected body of power crazed duplicitous politicians, whose accounts have NEVER been signed off, telling us to give them more money..

    And David Cameron, the man who promised us a referendum will pompously agee that
    “It is the right thing to do!”
    A man of honour? No! A TOADY of the EU. A man who makes the right noises and does nothing. A worthy political descendant of Neville Chamberlain..

    (I am NOT in a very good mood..)

  7. Noel: you’re joking, right? America under Obama-the-Socialist is now bankrupt – the EU is on the verge of falling apart…and you actually think that socialism works?

  8. Patty, are there any countries in the developed world that you do not consider “socialist”?

  9. Manuel Barroso said “The Euro faces its greatest challenge”.
    I can’t think of what the other challenges were, unless he’s thinking of the Irish ‘No’ vote which then became a ‘Yes’ vote when they were told to vote again.
    Not much of a challenge that one.
    (Enjoyed the article David)

  10. Germany is more ” socialist ” than the US and they’ve not run out of money.

    China is Communist in many respects and they’ve got lots of money too.

    A partially true slogan at best.

Comments are closed.