10 3 mins 10 yrs

It’s time to take a moment out of the daily hustle and bustle and reflect on what the US has actually achieved in Iraq. Today marks the formal ending of US operations in this theatre of war and were one to listen to the likes of the BBC one could be forgiven as seeing it as just one vast failure, costing thousands of lives. Futile; illegal; plain wrong.

It was anything but; Just consider;

1. Nine years on, Saddam is in his grave, hanged for his crimes against humanity. The removal of this tyrant has been a tremendous moral achievement.

2. His two evil sons, Uday and Qusay,  join him in hell and deservedly so given their serial barbarism. Iraq is infinitely a better place without these two monsters.

3. No more genocide conducted against the marsh Arabs, no more Halabja’s.

4. No more funding of the families of Palestinian suicide killers.

5. No more weapons of mass destruction – see point 3.

6. No more invasions of Arab neighbours.

A high price has been paid by US and UK soldiers. This wars was not conducted in the way I would have preferred and most certainly it was fought with one hand behind the back. I always favoured a harsher approach to the Baathists and an earlier exit, having crushed the “insurgents” into the dirt.  However the “International Community” and the Media did everything possible to oppose the war – they were busy gunning for Bush whilst our military were gunning for the Islamist killers that were attracted by the presence of Americans.

The decision to invade Saddam and remove him from power was long overdue. I congratulate President Bush for seeing the operation into being and above all I congratulate our brave and noble military for their years of heroism. Was it worth it? YES. America should stand proud of what it has acheived in Iraq. It is not perfect, it is not a Jeffersonian democracy. It has major problems. But it is a BETTER place than 9 years ago and we should have the courage to stand up and say so.

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

10 thoughts on “THE END OF IRAQI WAR DAYS..

  1. “A high price has been paid by US and UK soldiers.”

    But not nearly as high a price as had to be paid by Iraqi civilians, over 100,000 of whom lost their lives so that the US / UK could record the “tremendous moral achievement” of removing Saddam.

    But notice how all those civilians deaths are totally ignored in this post. Probably because they don’t “have the courage to stand up and say so”.

    Ignored is also the 2 trillion Dollar bill for the US taxpayer. But I’m sure they also think bankruptcy a price worth paying for making Iraq a BETTER place.

  2. Indeed, the Iraqis themselves, the majority at the hands of other Iraqis, perished in great numbers. The resulting state is an Iran-leaning ball of confusion that can’t defend its own borders. The death of rotten apples like the company Saddam & Sons was never the reason for the invasion. The attempts to tie the invasion to WMD, 9/11 and Osama were baseless. The lasting animosity and creation of a terrorist propaganda goldmine can not be disputed.

    The worst criticisms of taking over the country for its oil or turning it into a colony were untrue, but it is far from a happy chapter.

  3. Well done indeed to have toppled a tyrant. Kudos to our respective military.

    Yet, to replough an old furrow, could it not have been done by Special Ops? Perhaps I’m being naive and have watched too many movies but the nagging question still haunts me.

    How good are our special forces when it comes to assassinating a head of state? Would it have been possible for a crack team to have silenced Saddam and perhaps his sons as well?

    And if so, can’t we do something about Robert Mugabe? Only asking….

  4. Back to the golden age of ignorance – when I believed much of the propaganda excreted by the US and UK Establishment mouth-pieces. Indeed, we all wanted rid of Saddam because his army invaded Iran and Kuwait – without any ‘green light’ from the US!! And Rumsfeld never met Saddam etc., and Saddam’s soldiers threw babies out of incubators to die on hospital floors, and the WMD, and the ‘links’ to 9/11 – all lies, lies and more lies.

  5. I wonder if the decimated Iraqi christian community think it was worth it?

    Iran may well think it was worth it – they got rid of one of their most serious enemies and pretty much secured their Western flank.

  6. Richard Clinton, on December 15th, 2011 at 12:29 pm Said:

    And if so, can’t we do something about Robert Mugabe? Only asking….

    Something a fleet of B52’s should have done some time ago. Ironically the net death toll might have been less then what Comrade Bob, the late Comrade Hitler Hunsvi et all have all managed to date.

  7. David,
    I think you are wrong on this.
    Let’s suppose for a minute that we lived in a real democracy. Had the people been given a hand in shaping the basics of major foreign and domestic policies, I believe one tenet would have been that
    “We DON’T interfere in other nations’ domestic affairs UNTIL that country poses a DIRECT and EVIDENCED threat to our own security.”

    That means however much we dislike what is going on (and in this case, the West had helped keep him in power!) it is not our place to interfere.
    Same goes for Libya,
    Afghanistan
    Tibet
    Zimbabwe.

    As Richard mentioned above a special ops excursion into Afghanistan to deal with Osama Bin Laden, then withdraw.
    Every time the West intervenes, they actually upset/distort the natural order of things, and usually create more problems for the future.
    NOBODY but NOBODY likes someone coming in to tidy their garden. They resent it. Over a hundred thousand Iraqi casualties, 4,500 American servicemen and the stage set for years of trouble and bloodshed in that country.And angry and bitter Iraqis, Kurds and God knows whom else, scattered across the globe sowing the seeds of strife in otherwise stable nations.
    It wasn’t worth it.

  8. David; ‘Once Al Queda set up shop in Zimbabwe, we invade.’.
    Only if they bring oil with them.

Comments are closed.