10 2 mins 9 yrs

 

When contemplating writing about any serving member of our Armed Forces, there are two pointers I would normally use. Firstly, have they seen action at the sharp end; in other words, have they been shot at, and fired back: or have they been deliberately targeted by a hidden bomb? The second is, quite simple; are they of senior rank; colonel, general, air vice-marshal, vice-admiral?

If the second, they are usually political in nature, having scrambled up the greasy pole without struggle, used to sending the men under their command without proper equipment or protection: with the explicit knowledge of their political masters regarding these ‘money-saving’ tactics; but safe in the knowledge that the ordinary British ‘squaddie’ would sooner commit suicide than complain.

If the first, it becomes a trifle difficult. British soldiers are used to serving under truly ridiculous ‘rules of engagement’ authored by politicians who don’t understand that the opposition is doing their level best to kill any British serviceman. Ask any ‘squaddie’ who served at the front end in Belfast whether they consulted their ‘Orange Cards’ before firing back at some sociopath; ask if he felt justified in squashing some murderous clown before that IRA ‘volunteer’ killed a friend, or any more innocents?

All the same, as to whether Sergeant Alexander Blackman was justified in firing his weapon point blank at some wounded Afghani scum who had been trying to kill the Sergeant minutes before, I have no opinion. Other, of course that he was totally stupid in not confirming that all his mates’ helmet cameras were disabled!

 

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10 thoughts on “War; or plain, calculated murder?

  1. At the worst it might be considered as manslaughter, but no-way should it be called ‘murder’.

    That excuses can be found for numerous instances of manslaugter in civvy life, but not for the military, points very much to the strong vein of hypocrisy that runs through our military, political and judicial systems.

    Before passing judgement – what would anyone do in a similar circumstance of finding a severely wounded enemy lying on the ground? – considerations to be taken into account – was he lying on an explosive device, which may be triggered by moving him? – was he still armed and capable of using his weapon? – would leaving a comrade to watch over him until help arrived, endanger that comrade’s safety? – was ‘putting him out of his misery’, perhaps the kindest thing to day, in the event that help was not near at hand, and his wounds were of terminal consequence anyway?

    As they, ‘decisions, deisions!’ – and all to be made under extreme pressure, the likes of which many here are fortunate enough never likely to experince in a liftime.

    The man is a hero, and should receive recognition for it, – a reprimand would have been sufficient punishment!…

  2. He killed an unarmed, wounded enemy in a pre meditated act out of combat conditions. The fact that the Taliban guy was beaten before he was murdered negates all the ‘what ifs’ above regarding concealed explosives etc.

    No matter how it’s dressed up or excused this was murder and the only vein of hypocrisy is those who are trying to justify and diminish it.

  3. Ernest,
    Unfortunately for him you can’t ignore recorded evidence. The man said it himself,
    “I have just broken the Geneva Convention..”

    Whilst the Taliban certainly doesn’t recognise it, our country does. I feel great sorrow for him his wife and his family, but the authorities had to do something or else be exposed as hypocrites (we are anyway, but that’s another matter.)

    The people who should be in trial are our soundbite simple politicians, and personally I would not blame any young man opting for an alternative lifestyle rather than stay in our politically korrekt and manipulated military.

  4. All the same, as to whether Sergeant Alexander Blackman was justified in firing his weapon point blank at some wounded Afghani scum who had been trying to kill the Sergeant minutes before, I have no opinion. Other, of course that he was totally stupid in not confirming that all his mates’ helmet cameras were disabled!

    So you support the murder of unarmed prisoners. What a shock.

  5. At the worst it might be considered as manslaughter, but no-way should it be called ‘murder’.

    Look up the definition of manslaughter, you ignorant jerk.

  6. Peter,

    Well thank you for your thoughtful opinion, – no doubt delivered from the comfort of your armchair, and from the limitless depths of your personal inexperience!

  7. No doubt delivered from the comfort of your armchair, and from the limitless depths of your personal inexperience

    Ernest, if that rule precluded people from commenting on ATW there’s be very little to say around here.

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